birding

As per normal, my life contains way more than my blogging might suggest. Most of my posts remain in my head, but this event is worth sharing.

During the migration season, on my brother’s birthday, my mom and I met my brother, sister-in-law, and nephew for a day of birding near the Susquehanna River. It’s almost like cheating to go birding with my brother, Dave, and Collin. They know bird songs. So they say “Oh, that’s a yellow-billed-cuckoo singing, look over there.” And we see a yellow -billed -cuckoo.DSC_0105DSC_0108 (2)

This is also how we spotted the black and white warblerDSC_0009

And the orchard orioleDSC_0047

This is nephew Collin, my mom, and Dave on the hunt.DSC_0024

And this is Lisa.  Did I mention it rained much of the day?DSC_0021

I spotted this Canada goose family on my own. Love that row of fluffy babes.DSC_0130

Then we went to the nearby Conowingo Dam.DSC_0147

As we looked through binoculars, we realized that at the basin of the dam, there were hundreds of cormorants and bald eagles. I have never seen so many bald eagles at one time.DSC_0172 (2) There are at least seven bald eagles in this one zoomed in picture. Everywhere I looked, there was a similar count. It was awesome.DSC_0173_LI

It was a good day.

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a winter’s tale

Mockingbirds love our yard. They spend entire spring days here, singing to me as I garden. They nest here, raising their babies and dive bombing the dog if she gets too close. I’ve watched dozens of these sassy birds over the years, but I’ve never seen anything like the mockingbird who is spending this winter here.

mockingbirdHe flies in to meet me at the compost pile every day, and by the time I’ve emptied the bucket and turned around, he’s in there rummaging around for fresh tidbits. Where does he come from, and how does he know when to meet me there? Does he hear my feet crunching the snow on the long walk back there? Is he watching the house all day, just waiting for me to head to the back? It’s a mystery so far, but I’m on the case.